Reverend Horton Heat

Reverend Horton Heat

Wayne Hancock, Lincoln Durham, Cole Ray

Thursday, August 16, 2018

7:00 pm

Outland Ballroom

$20.00 - $25.00

This event is all ages

$2 minor charge at door

Reverend Horton Heat
Reverend Horton Heat
Recently, the Reverend Horton Heat, aka Jim Heath, had something along the lines of what he calls an epiphany.

He's a little tired of being taken so seriously-well, maybe not seriously, exactly, but you get the idea-and lately he's noticed that some of his funnier, country-tinged songs were his biggest crowd pleasers. Besides, being entertaining is what this is all about, right?

So, ladies and gents, roll your smokes up in your sleeve and hold on to your cowboy hats, it's time to take a trip back to a time before slick, over-produced country became the norm-a time when outlaws wrote songs about being without a pot to piss in-or at least about psycho exboyfriends and deadbeat girlfriends that spend your paycheck faster than you can say Lone Star.

Welcome to Laughin' and Cryin' with the Reverend Horton Heat a record full of country-heavy tunes about bad habits, well-meaning but clueless husbands, ever-expanding beer-guts and, well, Texas. It wouldn't be a Reverend Horton Heat record without a song or-in this case, two-about the Lone Star State. And, while Laughin' and Cryin' marks a detour from the hard driving punkabilly of the Rev's last record, 2004's Revival, this time tending toward honk, there's still some shit-kickers ["Death Metal Guys"] to let you know that Heath and crew still mean business.

"I really wanted to capture the feelings of recordings of the late '50s, early '60s," Heath said of the songs on the new record.

Exhibit A: Beer Holder, a honky-tonker about a guy who finds the table by his chair a bit too far of a stretch-so he opts for a new "beer holder," his growing gut. While this guy finds his solution genius, his woman thinks otherwise.

"[The record is] kind of from a regular guy point of view," Heath said. "You know, I like to do stuff that's kind of tongue-in-cheek that makes fun of the good old boy thing as much as trying to glorify the country boy thing."

Heath originally conceived the new record as the product of an alter ego, Harley Hog, a sort of "laughing and crying" singer.
Wayne Hancock
Wayne Hancock
"Wayne Hancock has more Hank Sr. in him than either I or Hank Williams Jr. He

is the real deal." - Hank III

"Hancock, who tosses out a roots mix of old country, roadhouse blues, western dance swing, boogie

bop, and straight-up rockabilly, takes what was once old and makes it seem like it's always been

and always will be."---allmusic.com

"The country music scene could do with a lot more characters like Wayne, who push the music's

limits while staying truer to its roots than any well-known names associated with the genre today."

– Slug Magazine

Since his stunning debut, Thunderstorms and Neon Signs in 1995, Wayne "The Train" Hancock has

been the undisputed king of Juke Joint Swing--that alchemist's dream of honky-tonk, western

swing, blues, Texas rockabilly and big band. Always an anomaly among his country music peers,

Wayne's uncompromising interpretation of the music he loves is in fact what defines him: steeped

in traditional but never "retro;" bare bones but bone shaking; hardcore but with a swing. Like the

comfortable crackle of a Wurlitzer 45 jukebox, Wayne is the embodiment of genuine, house rocking,

hillbilly boogie.

Wayne makes music fit for any road house anywhere. With his unmistakable voice, The Train's

reckless honky-tonk can move the dead. If you see him live (and he is ALWAYS touring), you'll

surely work up some sweat stains on that snazzy Rayon shirt you're wearing. If you buy his

records, you'll be rolling up your carpets, spreading sawdust on the hardwood, and dancing until

the downstairs neighbors are banging their brooms on the ceiling. Call him a throwback if you want,

Wayne just wants to ENTERTAIN you, and what's wrong with that?

Wayne's disdain for the slick swill that passes for real deal country is well known. Like he's fond of

saying: "Man, I'm like a stab wound in the fabric of country music in Nashville. See that bloodstain

slowly spreading? That's me."

Little known fact: Wayne is the only Bloodshot artist to have had their CD taken aboard a space

shuttle flight.

"A rare breed of traditionalist, one who imbues his retro obsessions with such high energy and

passions that his songs never feel like the museum pieces he's trying desperately to preserve." —

AllMusic.com
Lincoln Durham
Lincoln Durham
Armed with old bastardized mid-century guitars, hand-me-down fiddles and banjos, home-made contraptions with just enough tension on a string to be considered an instrument and any random percussive item he can get his hands or feet on, Lincoln Durham is a Obnoxious Southern-Gothic Psycho-Blues Revival-Punk One-Man-Band with a heavy amped edge, preaching the gospel of some new kind of depraved music. With driving guttural beats backboning various growling stringed instruments Lincoln gives birth to a sound that transcends genres with his dark, poetic and raw writing style telling tales that E.A. Poe would have been proud of.

Lincoln's musical odyssey began when his grandpa, Charlie, and dad, Ed, put a fiddle in his hands at age 4. He would grow into an accomplished fiddle player winning the Youth Fiddle Championship at age 10. Lincoln afterward followed the path so many musicians have, finding his vice in the seductive, siren-like callings of the electric guitar. Or, in Lincoln's case, the acoustic slide guitar with gnarly pickups haphazardly screwed into it.

Lincoln's true biography is in his live show. The passion in his sweat drenched, electrifyingly mesmerizing one-man-band show draws you in to feel every scar and drop of blood in his painfully intimate lyrics. It takes something beautifully "off" to get on stage with just hands and feet for a band, driven by a howling voice, and morbidly preach a music that harkens back to the old blues masters, Son House and Fred McDowell, infused with the edge and angst of Punk and darkened from the bad influences of Tom Waits and Nick Cave.
Cole Ray
Cole Ray
COLE RAY IS A NOISY 18 YEAR OLD ONE MAN BAND THAT RIPS, KICKS AND SPITS OUT GARAGE-ROCKABILLYISH-ECHOEY-REVERBED OUT TUNES.
Venue Information:
Outland Ballroom
324 South Ave
Springfield, MO, 65806